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Quantum technology 2.0

Quantum technology 2.0

When you think of quantum technology, you think of quantum computers. Or science fiction, light sabres and half-dead cats. But quantum technology is more than the chase for the quantum computer. The second quantum revolution is about breaking boundaries and taming nature’s smallest building blocks. What emerges is a superlative technology: smaller, faster, safer, more precise. And not to forget: more incomprehensible.

Quantum technology 1.0

Quantum technology 1.0

Quantum technology is on everyone’s lips. Boulevard newspapers report on quantum computers under the factual title “Computers will dominate mankind!” In most cases, quantum technology is presented mysteriously, as a product of the future: science fiction. But one point most articles keep quiet about: Quantum technology already exists and we all have it at home.

5 ways to deal with flexible working hours

5 ways to deal with flexible working hours

In my series “How to PhD”, I would like to present different aspects of the life of a PhD student, or more generally, a researcher. Who has not studied or done a PhD (yet) has usually little idea of how research actually works. I would like to change that in an entertaining way and in small servings! The focus of this article: flexible working hours.

The identity crisis of light

The identity crisis of light

Sometimes you have to make a choice. Some things you hate, for example, or you love them. Like Brussels sprouts, marzipan or Big Brother. In other cases, you have to take sides: Cats or dogs, Edward or Jacob, wave or particle. But as unlikely as it may sound, sometimes you can be two things at once. Although when this happens in the very foundations of physics, it can start heated discussions. Like at the beginning of the 20th century when Albert Einstein threw light into a deep identity crisis: wave or particle, which is it?

The two birthdays of quantum physics – Part 2: Einstein and the jumping spark

The two birthdays of quantum physics – Part 2: Einstein and the jumping spark

Is Einstein the father of quantum physics? Although most people associate him with the theory of relativity, Einstein made significant contributions to the development of quantum physics. In fact, he received his Nobel Prize in 1921 not for the theory of relativity, but for his explanation of the photoelectric effect – one of the key experiments in quantum physics. And like many discoveries in physics, this one was pure chance.

The Two Birthdays of Quantum Physics – Part 1: Planck and the Measure of Chaos

The Two Birthdays of Quantum Physics – Part 1: Planck and the Measure of Chaos

In my last article, I explained that, deep down, light consists of energy packets – quanta. These are created, for example, when light interacts with atoms, the building blocks of our world. That sounds very daring and raises many questions, some of them deeply philosophical. And while you are racking your brains about it, one question arises: Who actually thought this up?